Frenchy's avatar

Frenchy 41

Knob Scrubber (278)
Member
Apr 27, 2013
10:17 pm

Hi Everyone, I'm a French guy who is terrified of snakes because where I come from there aren't any, everytime I ride I'm always thinking of them and it has become a phobia because I usually ride on my own, I was wanting to know if you have ever been bitten or know of anyone who has when riding an MTB and what we should do if it happens? If I need to contact the emergency service by mobile how can they find my location when I'm riding in the bush, can't indicate an intersection Lol, and everyone tells me if you get bitten you can die in less then 10-20 mins??? your experience may be useful one day, thankslungs

 
Munrubenmuz's avatar

Munrubenmuz 48

Grim Ripper (1065)
Member
Apr 27, 2013
10:27 pm

You have a better chance of winning Gold Lotto than being (a) eaten by a shark in Australia and (b) dying of a snake bite in Australia so let those little factoids quell your fears a little.

Having said that though get some compression bandages and put them in your pack and then read this http://www.anaesthesia.med.usyd.edu.au/resources/venom/snakebite.html and watch this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0LK7euzGjA.

If you have an Android phone get this app which will broadcast your location at set intervals. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=net.madalex.android.apps.geosync

Mind you I've always wondered what to do when they say don't move and wait for help. But what do you do if you've been bitten and help aint coming? You can't stay there and die and according to all the literature you can't move either. I know you shouldn't ride alone but exactly what do you do if you get bitten and you need to get to civilisation?

In a pinch what is the correct thing to do?

(If I were you I'd be more worried about dropbears than some wussy snake. They seem to be able to smell a foreigner a mile off.)

✎ Apr 27, 2013 10:39 pm  
Frenchy's avatar

Frenchy 41

Knob Scrubber (278)
Member
Apr 27, 2013
10:32 pm

Eastern Tiger Snake

 
MaxR's avatar

MaxR

Knob Scrubber (276)
Member
Apr 27, 2013
10:38 pm

That looks like a carpet python which could hug you to death. Have ridden over or close to a couple of "Joe Blakes" which I have not seen in time to stop. Unclip feet up and roll past if possible then dismount and change the underwear. Snake is more worried than you. Go home and tell the story of the massive snake that gets bigger with each telling of the story. Best not to worry about them, just get out and ride. if your numbers up........

 
creaky's avatar

creaky

Knob Scrubber (431)
Member
Apr 27, 2013
10:49 pm

I think it kinda looks like a brown snake. Always carry a machete ....

 
OzCableguy's avatar

OzCableguy

Chainsucker (2542)
Member
Apr 27, 2013
10:55 pm

Quote: Munrubenmuz

In a pinch what is the correct thing to do?

The faster your heart rate is the faster the venom spreads so stay calm and move slowly (after applying first aid).

Add as many MTB mates to your phone book as possible so you can get hold of someone who knows how to find you.

 
Frank_80's avatar

Frank_80 36

Dirt Squirt (121)
Member
Apr 27, 2013
11:00 pm

Quote: Frenchy

Hi Everyone, I'm a French guy who is terrified of snakes because where I come from there aren't any, everytime I ride I'm always thinking of them and it has become a phobia because I usually ride on my own, I was wanting to know if you have ever been bitten or know of anyone who has when riding an MTB and what we should do if it happens? If I need to contact the emergency service by mobile how can they find my location when I'm riding in the bush, can't indicate an intersection Lol, and everyone tells me if you get bitten you can die in less then 10-20 mins??? your experience may be useful one day, thankslungs

Good question Frenchy. As an Irishman I'm always thinking of the same scenario i.e of being bitten by a snake whilst riding. It's those drop bears though that give me the fear.....they just don't take any hostages!

 
OzCableguy's avatar

OzCableguy

Chainsucker (2542)
Member
Apr 27, 2013
11:06 pm

I'll add that I knew a bloke who was bitten by an unidentified snake he disturbed in a wood pile. He didn't treat it as serious and just went about his business for several hours before he fell ill. When he did fall ill he needed hospitalisation to save his life, but the message is he didn't die in 10-20 mins like many people expect after being bitten so in in many cases you probably have some time up your sleeve. So treat it as emergency and get help asap but relax and don't assume you're going to die. Not panicking may save you.

 
shinydonkeyz's avatar

shinydonkeyz 39

Knob Scrubber (301)
Member
Apr 27, 2013
11:12 pm

Yep - thats's a brown. Don't listen to Creaky, those buggers are faster than any machete Smile

✎ Apr 27, 2013 11:13 pm  
GTer's avatar

GTer 43

Knob Scrubber (347)
Member
Apr 28, 2013
12:43 am

That could be a tiger snake with them stripes like that in the picture above.

Spring is when they are in abundance as it is breading season for them, normally the first bit of heat brings them out of hibernation. I have found eastern browns to be quite aggressive and territorial in breading season. They are an angry snake but most snakes will wonder off being more scared of you than you are of them. When they stand up like a walking stick they are ready to bite so be very still if this happens and they will wonder off when they think it is safe.

Just remember they are a very powerful creature so treat with much respect. If you are new to this country familiarize yourself with them, some tourist in Sydney picked up a death adder and thought it was a lizard and got whacked a few times from it. Don't ride over the top of them they can flick up onto wheel and chain and you really will ***.

✎ Apr 28, 2013 12:48 am  
That Pumptrack.....Guy's avatar

That Pumptrack.....Guy 41

Chainsucker (2705)
Member
Apr 28, 2013
06:29 am

You more likely to cash and die than get bitten by a snake.

But these suckers are NASTY http://australianmuseum.net.au/Drop-Bear

 
dereki's avatar

dereki

Noob (46)
Member
Apr 28, 2013
06:50 am

http://www.stjohn.org.au/images/stjohn/information/fact_sheets/FS_snakebite.pdf

1. Snakes usually are not loaded. ie they don't always have venom in their fangs. If you accidently run over one and it strikes chances are there is no venom. If the snake is hunting or you have been ***ing it off then there will be venom.

2. Snake venom moves via the lymph system. Heart rate doesn't matter so much bit movement does hence the need to stay still and not panic. The compression bandages stop the flow through the lynph system, not blood flow, so there is no need to do them up so tight your fingers/toes go blue.

 
OzCableguy's avatar

OzCableguy

Chainsucker (2542)
Member
Apr 28, 2013
09:36 am

Quote: dereki

2. Snake venom moves via the lymph system. Heart rate doesn't matter so much bit movement does hence the need to stay still and not panic. The compression bandages stop the flow through the lynph system, not blood flow, so there is no need to do them up so tight your fingers/toes go blue.

Oops. My bad. I think I knew that too once.
I once had a great memory, then I took an old to the everything... Sad

 
shinydonkeyz's avatar

shinydonkeyz 39

Knob Scrubber (301)
Member
Apr 28, 2013
09:45 am

I've not seen a live venomous snake out on the trails for years. I used to ride Mt Crosby a bit and saw lots of browns and blacks out there, mostly in the form of roadkill. Have unfortunately ridden over a 2.5m carpet snake who was sunbaking on a switchback. He seemed ok. I consider my own gumbiness a much greater risk than any snake - 2 broken bones, mashed-up patella, separated shoulders, a few stitches here and there, but no snakebites!

 
MrZ32's avatar

MrZ32

Dirt Squirt (202)
Member
Apr 28, 2013
10:41 am

If you were hours and hours away from anyone a tornequae may be required but you are making the call to lose that limb when it may not be required. But if you were within the confines of a bike Park. .. a compression bandage is more than adequate. .. keep the limb that was bitten still but the rest of your body can move. The lymph system works off muscle movement. .. if you don't move the muscles in the effected location you will be fine. But get to the hospital asap. Call an ambulance to meet you at the car park.

 
husky0's avatar

husky0 47

Gumby (78)
Member
Apr 28, 2013
12:30 pm

Quote: MrZ32

If you were hours and hours away from anyone a tornequae may be required but you are making the call to lose that limb when it may not be required. But if you were within the confines of a bike Park. .. a compression bandage is more than adequate. .. keep the limb that was bitten still but the rest of your body can move. The lymph system works off muscle movement. .. if you don't move the muscles in the effected location you will be fine. But get to the hospital asap. Call an ambulance to meet you at the car park.

Oh man never use a tourniquet other wise you will loose the limb. Snake venom is pumped around the body via the lymphatic system so putting one on will not stop the venom, using compression bandages and raising the limb will stop it more effectively. I was riding with my dog in Bunya State Forrest and he ran over a little snake sunning itself on the track. He did not even see it, the dog kept running, snake freaked and looked very angry, I stopped and the snake took off in the other direction. Remember snakes are more scared of you than you of it.

 
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MrZ32

Dirt Squirt (202)
Member
Apr 28, 2013
01:13 pm

I did say that you were making the call to lose the limb... Would not even consider this option if I was remotely near civilisation. However if I was 8 hours from the closest anything it may be the only option (the true outback requires a different set of rules to what us city guys have). And it will stop anything from getting past (if done properly) but will be horribly painful... probably more so than the effects of the poison. If you see a snake and you are carrying serious speed don't slow down. .. Just jump over the bloody thing.

 
MrZ32's avatar

MrZ32

Dirt Squirt (202)
Member
Apr 28, 2013
02:46 pm

Actually don't listen to me about the tourniquet, apparently although it would stop the venom and allow you to carry on but and here is the big but, when you get to the hospital and they have to release the tourniquet you can die from septicemia alone without venom. Only thing I can think of would be to amputate the limb from above the tourniquet. Stick with the very firm compression bandage but without cuttin the blood circulation.

 
finch's avatar

finch

Grim Ripper (1850)
Member
Apr 28, 2013
07:39 pm

I'd agree snakes are scared of you, but its the ones that attack and bite before they run off that are the problem. Browns are good for this, and probably the related varrieties.

 
jed's avatar

jed

Gumby (94)
Member
Apr 28, 2013
08:40 pm

Just to get back on topic...

There is always the possibility of getting bitten by a snake when MTBing. I often ride Castle Hill and have seen plenty of browns there.

First, the treatment: Immobilise the whole limb with a compression bandage, your fingers/toes should not be numb or cold. Don't move if possible. Phone the ambulance. No tourniquets or poison sucking!

How long have you got? If adequate first aid is applied, you have likely got several hours to get help. The exception is Taipan bites as they have a neurotoxin and can kill quite quickly - there was a death not that long ago when a Telstra worker was bitten. Taipans are usually coastal.

Most snake bites don't envenomate ie 'dry bites'. - said to be 70%. I rarely had to give anti-venom when I worked at a country hospital a few years ago where there were snake bites aplenty.

If you are riding by yourself, I would strongly suggest taking a bandage with and putting in your back pocket, and obviously also having communication.

Your chance of getting bitten on a bike is very low, but not impossible,